Gatekeeping in Food Writing and The Food World 

Most recently, revelations at Bon Appetit magazine have made evident the role that gatekeeping plays in the food and food media worlds in terms of preventing women, BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and other marginalized communities from getting a seat at the table. This panel will explore this dynamic of exclusion, as well as how members of marginalized […]

Imagining Other Americas 

Presented with the New York Review of Books. We are living in an America that was, not very long ago, unimaginable to many of us: a country whose political life, economic prospects, and natural environment all resemble something out of dystopian (or, in the case of the environment, science-fiction). This panel gathers together a varied […]

Vision and Revisions in Popular Music 

The story of popular music—the meaning and legacy of its key figures and unrecognized innovators, and how it has both shaped and reflected the societal forces, conversations and revolutions of our times—is forever being written and rewritten. Explore with three bold chroniclers of sound and politics: Sasha Geffen (Glitter Up the Dark: How Pop Music […]

Art Activism and Curatorial Perspectives

Kimberly Drew, arts writer, curator, and activist, This Is What I Know About Art, in conversation with celebrated photographer, artist, curator and author, Deborah Willis talking about art as both a reflection on society and an opportunity to change society and make inclusive space for artists. Moderated by Naomi Extra, scholar, poet and writer.

Colson Whitehead & Arundhati Roy – A Reading 

Colson Whitehead and Arundhati Roy, two writers whose work has become powerfully embedded in our imagination over the past few decades, read from their recent work, followed by Q & A.  Whitehead, winner of the 2017 BoBi award, will read from his novel, The Nickel Boys, winner of the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Roy, […]

Food Justice: Eating for A Better Tomorrow

Eating today carries the weight of a myriad of environmental and social issues, and in doing so raises many questions about what it means to be a conscious and conscientious consumer, and the degree to which this is possible. This panel examines how we as eaters and cooks are complicit in these issues but also […]

Art Talk: POV

Jerry Saltz, a Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic, senior art critic of New York Magazine and author of How To Be An Artist and Darby English, art historian, Carl Darling Buck Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago and author of To Describe a Life: Notes from the Intersection of Art and Race Terror, […]

Beyond Representational Politics 

As recent but all too familiar events force the country to grapple with its legacy of violence and racism, igniting a hopeful movement for substantive change across government and within industries, it is vital to engage not only perennial questions about representational politics in publishing, but also the material and demographic inequities in the industry […]

Pandemic Times 

How will life in the pandemic define society or change it? Mark Honigsbaum (The Pandemic Century: 100 Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris), Paolo Giordano (How Contagion Works: Science, Awareness and Community in Times of Global Crisis), and Sonia Shah (Pandemic: Tracking Contagions from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond) discuss personal and political responses to […]

Stand Up, Speak Out

From humor to horror, from journalism to first-person POV, these authors explore connections between uprisings of the past and speaking out loud in the present day. Travel from the protests against war and incarceration in the 1970s with Jared Reinmuth (Big Black: Stand at Attica) and Derf Backderf (Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio) to […]

Jim Crow New York

For most of our history the story has gone that white Southerners were racists while white Northerners were not. Today that myth is largely dismantled, thanks in part to two historians whose books lay bare the pernicious and widespread racism up north, and lift up the leaders and movements fighting these systems. Clarence Taylor (Fight […]

Multiple Witnesses, Multiple Realities 

Who do we trust to tell a story and who are the true witnesses to a reality impossible to understand from just one angle? Featuring Fernanda Melchor, Marcial Gala, and Nona Fernandez, this panel delves into the work of three vibrant new writers from Latin America whose novels provide polyphonic examinations of collective reckoning. Fernanda […]

Waking Up From The American Dream

 Is it still possible to improve your lot in life??  Was it ever? Essayist Eula Biss (Having and Being Had), cultural historian Imani Perry (Breathe: A Letter to My Sons), journalist Ada Calhoun (Why We Can’t Sleep: Women’s New Midlife Crisis), and economist Stephanie Kelton (The Deficit Myth) discuss who is and isn’t able to […]

Unraveling The Past 

Though what emerges are two very different reads, both authors share an investigative, almost true-crime approach to their overlapping subjects: where Nick Flynn (This Is the Night Our House Will Catch Fire) goes on a personal detective hunt into the mysterious events of his family’s traumatic past and his mother’s profound struggles during his childhood, […]

Preparing For The Presidential Elections 

Are we ready for this?​ Historian Carol Anderson (One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy), alongside former political consultant and Lincoln Project co-founder Rick Wilson (Running Against the Devil) and New York Times editorial board member Jesse Wegman (Let the People Pick the President: The Case for Abolishing the Electoral College). […]

On Borders, Real and Imagined 

What is a border and who or what are they meant to contain? Poets and writers Claudia Rankine (Just Us: An American Conversation), Cathy Park Hong (Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning), and New York Times culture writer Jenna Wortham (Black Futures) discuss borders and their many manifestations through genre, race and ethnicity, migration, the […]

A Life in Reading 

Legendary critic and memoirist Vivian Gornick (Unfinished Business: Notes of a Chronic Re-Reader) speaks with Adrienne Miller, the first woman to be literary esquire at Esquire (In the Land of Men: A Memoir) about finding your place in the city, in the world, and sometimes in yourself, through reading and writing. Moderated by poet, translator, […]

Finish The Fight With The New York Times

Written by New York Times journalists, the now best-selling Finish the Fight captures untold stories in the fight for women’s right to vote, particularly the underrepresented but vital voices of BIPOC and queer activists. The Times is thrilled to join the Brooklyn Book Festival to discuss the genesis, creation, and impact of this recent release. […]

Race and Caste 

Does the concept of race hide more than it reveals? Join Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel Wilkerson (Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents) in conversation with sociologist Michael Eric Dyson (Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America, forthcoming) about racial hierarchy, the possibility of historical change, and rethinking the frameworks that brought us here.

Transcending Grief 

Although these authors explore the tragedy of losing family members and friends, they also highlight the triumph of finding new life in the vacuums every loss leaves behind. Join debut novelist Ilana Masad (All My Mother’s Lovers), National Book Award–winning novelist Sigrid Nunez (What Are You Going Through), and National Humanities Medal recipient Joyce Carol […]

True Crime 

Join Hallie Rubenhold, Baillie Gifford Prize-winning chronicler of the victims of Jack the Ripper, in conversation with Casey Cep, whose book on the courtroom drama of a 1970s serial killer, Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud and the Last Trial of Harper Lee, was also shortlisted for the prize last year. They discuss their books, The Five […]

Technology’s Past and Future

How is technology changing our daily lives? And how may we change it for the better? Three recent books provide fascinating answers to these questions. Charlton McIlwain’s Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter, offers a compelling history and theory of how many forms of bias and subordination […]

Cooking For These Times

The pandemic has changed home cooking and our relationship with our pantries, along with our concept of what “worthy” and “accessible” cooking projects entail. Over the last few months, homemade sourdough loaves have proliferated, yeast, beans, and flour have become treasured commodities, and experienced and fledgling home cooks alike have found themselves searching for new […]

Translating Lives and Legacies in Food Culture

Writing about family or historical figures presents a delicate challenge: How can a new work remain faithful to the work and words of others? How can it retain their voices, and the spirit that animates their efforts? How much should the themes of these personal stories transcend their subjects? And, of course, what can you […]

The Landscape of Loss

Grieving the loss of a loved one can feel like a tangle of contradictions: an experience at once intensely personal and subjective while also deeply, fundamentally human. Join Kat Chow (Seeing Ghosts), Adam Mansbach (I Had a Brother Once), and Nadia Owusu (Aftershocks) as they share their own journeys navigating this fraught yet fertile terrain—and […]

Driven By The Past

When critical analysis and even basic facts of American history are under attack, regarding events of four centuries ago or from earlier this year, what can we learn from stories of Black life that have been distorted, immortalized, or lost? How can African American storytelling traditions help charge and change what we understand about our […]

Incarceration and its Afterlives

Though they are often overlooked, the burdens of prison do not fall only on prisoners. The friends, loved ones, and communities of people who are incarcerated—and even those who have served their time and returned home—often find their lives reshaped. Sociologist Reuben Jonathan Miller (Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration) with […]

The Science of Life

Scientists and science writers discuss what it means to be alive in a world where life can be created, is under threat, and is still being discovered. Neil Shubin (Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA), Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein (The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, […]

Finding Ourselves and Our Tribe(s) in Popular Music

Danyel Smith (Shine Bright: A Very Personal History of Black Women in Pop) and Kelefa Sanneh (Major Labels: A History of Popular Music in Seven Genres) have lived, breathed, and written about music for decades—and their epic new books are both years in the making. But beyond the ambitious scope, what these projects share is […]

A Major Ingredient is the Cook

Three popular chefs talk about their new books: Cal Peternell (Burnt Toast and Other Disasters), chef of Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse; food and culture writer Matt Rodbard (Food IQ: 100 Questions, Answers, and Recipes to Raise Your Cooking Smarts, co-authored by Daniel Holzman) and Nicole A. Taylor (Watermelon and Red Birds: A Cookbook for Juneteenth […]

AAWW Presents: Writing in Wartime

Writers from Korea, Iraq, Vietnam, and Bangladesh join the Asian American Writers’ Workshop to discuss writing about war and its aftermath and effects on the Asian diaspora in America. Crystal Hana Kim, Faleeha Hassan, Ly Tran, and Jennifer Chowdhury will share their distinct perspectives with Jafreen Uddin, Executive Director of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop.

Secret of the Stacks

Did you know that New York City’s top cultural institutions house some of the rarest, most unique books, manuscripts, and printed materials found anywhere? Join Julie Golia, Associate Director of Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books and Charles J. Liebman Curator of Manuscripts at the New York Public Library, Jesse Erickson, the Morgan’s Astor Curator of […]

A Constructive Conversation About Elite Power and Change

From interminable inequalities and injustices to culture wars, our challenges can seem intractable and our discourse stubbornly fixed. Join Bill McKibben (The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon) and Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (Elite Capture: How the Powerful Took Over Identity Politics, and Everything Else) as they look with fresh eyes at systemic elitism in […]

Money and Madness

Can money really buy freedom? Why do we strive for wealth, even when it threatens to imperil us? Alexander Maksik’s The Long Corner and Whiting Award winner Hernan Diaz’s Trust both masterfully tackle these universal human dilemmas as they explore the gravitational pull of capital, the permeable nature of reality in a chaotic world, and […]

Reinventing the Memoir

Your story is never just your own—so many other voices and stories have and will shape it. What are the limits of memoir? What can you find in the margins of and gaps in memory, story, and realities? And how, ultimately, does the memoirist pull self, family, criticism, and history together within the confines of […]

A Critical and Constructive Conversation About Elite Power and Change

From interminable inequalities and injustices to culture wars, our challenges can seem intractable and our discourse stubbornly fixed. Join Bill McKibben (The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon) and Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (Elite Capture: How the Powerful Took Over Identity Politics, and Everything Else) as they look with fresh eyes at systemic elitism in […]

A Half Century of Hip-Hop

This summer’s grand celebration of hip-hop’s 50th anniversary was beautiful and affirming for longtime fans and practitioners of this perennially maligned and underestimated genre/subculture. Now that the landmark events have passed, what do we make of not just the story of hip-hop but its evolving place in the public imagination? Jonathan Abrams (The Come Up: […]

Books Unbanned: A Night of Artivism (In Person)

Books Unbanned: A Night of Artivism is an afterparty with a purpose featuring live performances from acclaimed artists, activists and actors! The event will feature special guest authors including Ibram Kendi, Michael Harriot, Dr. Kaye Whitehead and more. Hosted by author and AAPF Executive Director Kimberle Crenshaw, the event will also feature music by a […]

PEN Presents: Free the Books

In facing the rising threats to the freedoms to read and imagine, PEN America convenes a dialogue with beloved writers on the recent and dramatic rise in the efforts to censor and silence Black and LGBTQ+ perspectives. New York Times bestselling author Casey McQuiston and independent publisher and children’s author Cheryl Willis Hudson, will be […]

Reading Wars presented by The New York Review of Books

Reading and writing have rarely been as politicized in the US as they are today. While GOP governors and legislators enact bans on books and syllabuses they see as undermining core American values—targeting works that touch on race, gender, and sexuality—some on the Left have argued for purging syllabuses of once-canonical authors and even altering […]

Secrets of the Stacks 2023

The natural world, music and cultural heritage reside in the striking and unique library collections found in some of New York City’s top cultural institutions. Join Rhonda Evans, Director, Mertz Library at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, the largest botanical research library, in the U.S; Dr. John O’Neill, Curator of Rare Books […]

Can the Future Be Saved? A Conversation with Anand Giridharadas and Chris Hayes

Can the Future Be Saved? A Conversation with Anand Giridharadas. In The Persuaders: At the Front Lines of the Fight for Hearts, Minds, and Democracy, Anand Giridharadas profiles organizers, politicians, and ordinary citizens who live there without losing an unyielding faith that they can make the world they want to see one conversation at a […]

Books Unbanned: A Night of Artivism (In Person)

Books Unbanned: A Night of Artivism is an afterparty with a purpose featuring live performances from acclaimed artists, activists and actors! The event will feature special guest authors including Ibram Kendi, Michael Harriot, Dr. Kaye Whitehead and more. Hosted by author and AAPF Executive Director Kimberle Crenshaw, the event will also feature music by a […]

Played a Good Book Lately? (In Person)

We all remember Choose Your Own Adventures, but interactive stories have come a long way since the days of page-jumping pulp. What does it mean for a game to be literary in today’s media-saturated landscape? Join game designer and author Sharang Biswas, game editor and narrative designer Jess Haskins, Naomi Clark and game designer and […]

Creatures

What does the natural world reveal about the human one? Join Sabrina Imbler (How Far the Light Reaches: A Life in Ten Sea Creatures), astrobiologist Aomawa Shields (Life on Other Planets: A Memoir of Finding My Place in the Universe), and Ed Yong (An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us) […]

Laughing Through Life: Humor, Heart, and Honest Reflections

Get ready for a side-splitting and thought-provoking panel featuring authors and essayists Samantha Irby and Aparna Nancherla. In Quietly Hostile, Samantha Irby leads us through personal essays tackling life’s absurdities with a witty and candid perspective. Aparna Nancherla’s Unreliable Narrator weaves comedy and introspection into a unique experience of imposter syndrome. Led by Brian Vines, […]

Lifestyle in the Library

A library of food? about toys? Join Liz Williams, founder of the Southern Food & Beverage Museum and of the National Food & Beverage Foundation, Leslie Sam, Chief Librarian, Nunez Community College Library and Christopher Bensch, Vice President for Collections at The Strong National Museum of Play, in a discussion about developing and curating unique […]

PEN Presents: Free the Books

In facing the rising threats to the freedoms to read and imagine, PEN America convenes a dialogue with beloved writers on the recent and dramatic rise in the efforts to censor and silence Black and LGBTQ+ perspectives. New York Times bestselling author Casey McQuiston and independent publisher and children’s author Cheryl Willis Hudson, will be […]

Cooking Across Borders

Across the African diaspora today, the word “foodways” conjures movement that is both multidirectional and multidimensional. Maria Bradford (Sweet Salone: Recipes from the Heart of Sierra Leone), Kenny Gilbert (Southern Cooking, Global Flavors), and Pierre Thiam (Simply West African: Easy, Joyful Recipes for Every Kitchen) embody personal and professional geographies that span the U.S., West […]

Can the Future Be Saved? A Conversation with Anand Giridharadas

In The Persuaders: At the Front Lines of the Fight for Hearts, Minds, and Democracy, Anand Giridharadas profiles organizers, politicians, and ordinary citizens who face insecurity, crisis, and division without losing an unyielding faith that they can make the world they want to see one conversation at a time. How do we get there from […]

On the Cancel Culture Spectrum

We all have been disappointed, dismayed or angry with creators, leaders and celebrities whose work we admire, but whose personal actions are inappropriate, reprehensible, or worse. But, as individuals, we are responsible to activate the cancel culture spectrum from punishment to redemption and need to consider ramifications. Is accountability the middle ground? Ernest Owens, The […]

From Mississippi to Minneapolis: A Continuum of White Violence

In their 2023 Pulitzer Prize-winning His Name Is George Floyd, Washington Post journalists Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa contextualize Floyd’s life and death, looking at the story of the man—whose 2020 killing sparked the largest protests ever against racial injustice—through the critical lens of white supremacy past and present. Now, in this wide-ranging discussion led […]

Drag, Ballroom, and Cultural Consciousness

Drag and ballroom have long been fierce art forms, vehicles of self-expression, rebellion, celebration, and love. On this panel, authors Charles Busch (Leading Lady: A Memoir of a Most Unusual Boy), Elyssa Goodman (Glitter and Concrete: A Cultural History of Drag in New York City), and Ricky Tucker (And the Category Is: Inside New York’s […]

American Slavery, Today

Slavery’s centrality to American history has gained wide acceptance but few people understand how it continues to reach through the past and shape the experience of our country today. Join Rachel Swarns (The 272: The Families Who Were Enslaved and Sold to Build the American Catholic Church), Kidada E. Williams (I Saw Death Coming: A […]

Embrace the Unconventional: Reclaiming Your Freedom

This panel brings together the imaginative minds of Jenny Odell and Jessica Elefante as they challenge the norms of this disjointed era. Saving Time: Discovering a Life Beyond the Clock by Jenny Odell is a daring inspection of liberation from the clock’s constraints, while Jessica Elefante’s Raising Hell, Living Well: Freedom from Influence in a […]

Artificial Intelligence: Will AI Need Us?

Last spring, 2000 scientists signed a cautionary letter warning about the profound risks to humanity if artificial intelligence systems continue to develop unregulated. Benefits from mundane mapping to robot vacuuming, auto-completed texts and editing, as well as sophisticated manufacturing, medical, and military systems, are already in place. That AI will move on to develop into […]

Maggie Smith in conversation with Lauren Christensen

Author of You Could Make This Place Beautiful, Maggie Smith, uses her own personal experiences and expands to dissect traditional modern womanhood, patriarchal dynamics and power structures. She will be joined by moderator Lauren Christensen, New York Times book editor. Together, they will discuss self-exploration, what it means to discover power after loss and writing your own narrative.

Secrets of the Stacks 2023

The natural world, music and cultural heritage reside in the striking and unique library collections found in some of New York City’s top cultural institutions. Join Rhonda Evans, Director, Mertz Library at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, the largest botanical research library, in the U.S; Dr. John O’Neill, Curator of Rare Books […]

Reading Wars presented by The New York Review of Books

Reading and writing have rarely been as politicized in the US as they are today. While GOP governors and legislators enact bans on books and syllabuses they see as undermining core American values—targeting works that touch on race, gender, and sexuality—some on the Left have argued for purging syllabuses of once-canonical authors and even altering […]

A Half Century of Hip-Hop

This summer’s grand celebration of hip-hop’s 50th anniversary was beautiful and affirming for longtime fans and practitioners of this perennially maligned and underestimated genre/subculture. Now that the landmark events have passed, what do we make of not just the story of hip-hop but its evolving place in the public imagination? Jonathan Abrams (The Come Up: […]

Food, Community, and California

 Food connects places, ingredients and, most importantly, people – a fact celebrated in new cookbooks from native or adoptive Californian authors Rahanna Bisseret Martinez (Flavor+Us: Cooking for Everyone), Tanya Holland (Tanya Holland’s California Soul), and Natasha Pickowicz (More Than Cake: 100 Recipes Built for Pleasure and Community). Connection, inspiration, reliance, and a spirit of service […]

The Miss Manhattan Non-Fiction Reading Series Presents: New York Stories (In Person)

Miss Manhattan is excited to join the Brooklyn Book Festival as an official Bookend event with Miss Manhattan Presents: New York Stories. Created to give non-fiction writers a louder voice in the New York literary scene, the Miss Manhattan Non-Fiction Reading Series is hosted and curated by Manhattan-based writer and photographer Elyssa Goodman. This reading […]

Lab[our] Issue Launch (In Person)

In partnership with the Brooklyn Book Festival, Lampblack invites you to share in the launch of our third volume: Lab[our]. Merchandise and copies of the issue will be available for purchase, along with drinks at the Center for Fiction café. There will be live readings from the magazine, featuring t’ai freedom ford, James Stewart III, […]

Annual Brooklyn Indie Party! (In Person)

On Friday night, Greenlight is delighted to once again partner with Community of Literary Magazines & Presses (CLMP), as well as some of Brooklyn’s best independent book and magazine publishers, to throw a Brooklyn-sized party celebrating the spirit of literary independence in our borough. Partygoers are invited to mingle with Brooklyn authors and publishers, discover […]

– CHANGED TO ZOOM – The New Voices of Arab American Literature (Virtual)

In the contentious battleground of political America, Arab American writers have strived to drown out the divisive rhetoric through compelling, evocative portraits of life in the Arab world, diasporic ache, and subversion of embedded stereotypes. We meet with five Arab American writers to learn the narratives that guide their work, how they write and recollect […]

Spirit and Flesh: Our Bodies, Our Blackness, Ourselves (In Person & Virtual)

In her stunning 2022 debut, This Here Flesh: Spirituality, Liberation, and the Stories That Make Us, Cole Arthur Riley weaves three generations of family tales and contemplative reflections on belonging, dignity, and liberation. She joins Tracey Michae’l Lewis-Giggetts whose books Then They Came for Mine: Healing from the Trauma of Racial Violence and Black Joy: […]

The Shining by Dorothea Lasky (In Person)

Dorothea Lasky’s The Shining is an ekphrastic horror lyric that shapes an entirely unique feminist psychological landscape. In this collection, Lasky guides us through the familiar rooms of the Overlook Hotel, both realized and imagined, inhabiting characters and spaces that have been somewhat flattened in Stephen King’s text or Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptations. Dorothea Lasky […]

– CHANGED TO ZOOM – Let’s Get Mad: Celebrate a Mutha of a Decade (Virtual)

It’s a rager: mother-writers and artists get real, down and dirty, furious and funny about the lives of mothers (and others). Readings at Books are Magic Montague by Minna Dubin (Mom Rage), Amanda Montei (Touched Out), cartoonist Lisa Lim (A Darker Shade of Noir), and Deesha Philyaw (The Secret Lives of Church Ladies). Celebrating 10 […]

Queens, NY: Fact and Fiction (In Person)

Join authors and historians Rob MacKay, Seth Bornstein, and Rafael Herrin-Ferri as they dive into Queens history. They will discuss the borough’s built environment and how diversity influences our residences, the people, and their connection to our borough. Kew & Willow Books, 81-63 Lefferts Blvd, Kew Gardens, NY 11415 https://www.kewandwillow.com/

The Rumpus Presents Sapphic Storytelling: Queer eQuinox (In Person)

The Rumpus presents Sapphic Storytelling: Queer eQuinox at McNally Jackson’s Seaport location. Featuring authors Hannah Beresford, Jaquira Díaz, CJ Hauser, Lars Horn, T Kira Madden, and Kelley Van Dilla. Moderated by Rumpus Editor, Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn. In this series, we present writers we adore and use the term “sapphic” as a tongue-in-cheek term to […]

No, YOU Tell It! “Fly By” True-Life Tales with a Twist (In Person)

No, YOU Tell It! storytellers work together to develop true tales on the page, then swap stories to embody their partner’s culture, identity, and life experience on stage. For this special show, four curated storytellers are trading tales inspired by Queens history from the archives of The Greater Astoria Historical Society (astorialic.org). Plus, story trivia […]

John Oliver Killens Literary Salon: A Celebration of Black Fire This Time (In Person)

The Center for Black Literature, in collaboration with MoCada, will present the Killens Literary Salon with contributors to Black Fire This Time: Keisha-Gaye Anderson (Gathering the Waters), James E. Cherry (Edge of the Wind), Judy Juanita (De Facto Feminism), Quincy Troupe (Duende: Poems), and moderator Heather Buchanan (Aquarius Press). Black Fire This Time by Kim […]

An Evening with The Keepthings Presented by Ditmas Lit (In Person)

The Keepthings publishes short essays about lost loved ones, inspired by the things they left behind. Co-hosted by Ditmas Lit, this event will feature Keepthings contributors Tara Lindis, Matthew Lansburgh, Rachel Cline, Claudia Zuluaga, and Anja Wood sharing their stories and the objects that inspired them in front of a live audience for an evening of […]

The Lost Sons of Omaha: An American Tragedy (In Person & Virtual)

On May 30, 2020, in Omaha, Nebraska, 38-year-old white bar owner and Marine veteran Jake Gardner fatally shot James Scurlock, a 22-year-old Black man protesting the murder of George Floyd. Following an indictment, Gardner took his own life. In The Lost Sons of Omaha: Two Young Men in an American Tragedy, Joe Sexton offers a […]

Radical Publishing in Political Headwinds (In Person)

Publishers from independent presses discuss the imperative of publishing books that uplift marginalized and insurgent voices, create and complicate representation, and spark and amplify movements. This is even more critical during challenging political times when marginalized communities are disempowered, scapegoated, and stripped of their rights. Margot Atwell (Feminist Press), Malav Kanuga (Common Notions Press), Ramsey […]

Easily Slip Into Another World: A Life in Music with Henry Threadgill (In Person)

Henry Threadgill is a towering figure of contemporary American music. His autobiography is a riveting account of the music scene in Chicago in the 1960s, his experiences as a Black soldier in Vietnam, and the ensembles he has led—and is a powerful meditation on history, race, capitalism, and art. Henry Threadgill is one of only […]

Powerful and Dangerous: the Legacy of Audre Lorde (Virtual)

The Alice Austen House, nationally designated site of LGBTQ+ history, will host a virtual reading celebrating the legacy of Audre Lorde’s teaching. Join us as former students Kathleen Walsh D’Arcy, Donna Masini, Melinda Goodman, and Rosette Capotorto read their poetry and share memories of their time in Lorde’s literature program. https://aliceausten.org

A Night of Ancient Mystery, Mozart, & Merriment (In Person)

Please join the Coffee House Club’s Urbane Conspirators and HIP Lit for an unforgettable night cloaked in Gothic suspense as mysteries abound in readings, conversation, and music. To be held at Salmagundi, a private arts club housed in a historic brownstone mansion in Greenwich Village. All in celebration of the paperback release of Joanna Margaret‘s […]

VOICE: A Lens to Black Experiences (Virtual)

Diversity is a call to arms, challenging society to be inclusive. The Black community is richly diverse, comprising many villages. We compare the teachings of forefathers from other places and grandmothers who’d migrated north or across oceans by choice. We are the ancestors in our lineage. We perceive the world differently and filter those experiences […]

What’s Community Got to Do with It? (In Person)

Join the Resort writing community as we revisit the old stomping grounds of the LIC Reading Series (2015-’20). Denne Michele Norris (writer & editor-in-chief, Electric Literature), Greg Mania (Born to Be Public), and Matt Ortile (The Groom Will Keep His Name) will be in conversation with Resort & LIC Reading Series founder Catherine LaSota about […]

Starting Out: The Editor-Writer Relationship (In Person)

What is an editor’s role? How can an author work with an editor to elevate their writing? Join Writing and Editorial Fellows from A Public Space for a conversation about the editor-writer relationship. They’ll discuss lessons learned and insights gained, formative experiences, and their questions for each other about the surprises they found on their […]

Transcending Geographical and Temporal Boundaries on the Page (In Person)

What’s it like to resurrect a past book and prepare it for a second life in translation? Whether it’s a debut translated into a new language or a special reissue of essays first conceived decades past. What social mores or cues have changed that could impact reception? How do language and geographic location influence the […]

The Role of the Artist in a Time of Crisis (In Person)

From Booker Prize-winning poet, novelist, essayist, short-story writer, anthologist, aphorist, and playwright Ben Okri & Africa Center CEO Uzodinma Iweala, comes a fascinating discussion on the role of the artist in a time of crisis. Whether it be climate change, the refugee crisis, racism, philosophy, the pandemic, or any number of varied topics he takes, […]