Virtual Festival Events

Please check back later for our events listing.

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

From existential crises and trauma to months spent in quarantine, there are plenty of reasons one may feel the need to escape their family. Award-winning novelist Bernice L. McFadden (Sugar), New York Times best-selling author Emma Straub (All Adults Here), and critically acclaimed author Karolina Waclawiak (Life Events) discuss what happens when characters leave their comfort zones to encounter different ways of living. Moderated by Jordy Rosenberg, author of Confessions of the Fox.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Poetry

Poets Aria Aber (Hard Damage), Diannely Antigua (Ugly Music), Ricardo Alberto Maldonado (The Life Assignment), and John Murillo (Kontemporary Amerikan) will read from their recently published volumes of poetry. Introduced by Nikay Paredes, Academy of American Poets.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Food / Non-Fiction

Most recently, revelations at Bon Appetit magazine have made evident the role that gatekeeping plays in the food and food media worlds in terms of preventing women, BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and other marginalized communities from getting a seat at the table. This panel will explore this dynamic of exclusion, as well as how members of marginalized communities have been able to break through by both playing by the rules and breaking them. Panelists will include writers such as Victoria James (Wine Girl: The Humiliations, Obstacles, and Triumphs of America’s Youngest Sommelier), John Birdsall (The Man Who Ate Too Much: The Life of James Beard), and Jessica Harris (My Soul Looks Back) whose works have focused on breaking into exclusive worlds and the barriers to doing so. Moderated by Priya Krishna, author of Indian-ish.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Each season the Brooklyn Book Festival selects a few debut authors whose books we think shouldn’t be missed.  This year’s debut book picks include: The New WildernessDiane Cook, Like A BirdFariha Róisín, My Mother’s HouseFrancesca Momplaisir, What’s Left of Me Is YoursStephanie Scott, Whiteout ConditionsTariq Shah, Sharks In the TIme of Saviors Kawai Strong Washburn. Meet these debut authors, who will each read a selection from their book.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Children / Fiction

Join R.L. Stine, one of America’s best-selling children’s authors in history (The Goosebumps series and Fear Street) and Tim Jacobus, an American artist, illustrator and video games designer best known for illustrating the covers for nearly 100 books in the R. L. Stine’s Goosebumps series, as they talk about the stories they tell, their collaborative imagination, and share some secrets behind some original Goosebumps’ covers!  R.L. Stine’s latest book in the Goosebumps series is My Friend Slappy (Goosebumps SlappyWorld #12).

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Poetry

Even in prose, some narratives are best expressed through the rhythms and techniques of poetry. Through precise and artful language, these innovative and observant poets and authors explore the nature of time, the experience of consciousness, and the aftermath of history. Join award-winning poet Carolyn Forché (In the Lateness of the World), Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa (The Chameleon Couch), and critically acclaimed novelist Kate Zambreno (Drifts) for a discussion of their creative work. Moderated by Pitchaya Sudbanthad, author of Bangkok Wakes to Rain.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Comics / Fiction

 Let’s get ready to rumble! You won’t want to miss this epic live-action drawing competition refereed by the brilliant and award-winning artist Raúl The Third (VAMOS! Let’s Go Eat) and featuring talented illustrators Ebony Glenn (Not Quite Snow White), Ruth Chan (The Great Indoors), Juana Medina (We Are the Change), and Kevin Sherry (Squidding Around: Fish Feud!).

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Non-Fiction

Presented with the New York Review of Books. We are living in an America that was, not very long ago, unimaginable to many of us: a country whose political life, economic prospects, and natural environment all resemble something out of dystopian (or, in the case of the environment, science-fiction). This panel gathers together a varied group of frequent contributors to The New York Review of Books, representing the worlds of journalism, political commentary, and fiction, to grapple with the question of how those and other modes of writing might help us to envision still other versions of America. Join authors Hari Kunzru (Red Pill), Fintan O’Toole (The Politics of Pain), and Namwali Serpell (The Old Drift) for a conversation moderated by Madeleine Schwartz, creator of The Ballot, about the Americas that might have been—and might be still.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

The story of popular music—the meaning and legacy of its key figures and unrecognized innovators, and how it has both shaped and reflected the societal forces, conversations and revolutions of our times—is forever being written and rewritten. Explore with three bold chroniclers of sound and politics: Sasha Geffen (Glitter Up the Dark: How Pop Music Broke the Binary), Maureen Mahon (Black Diamond Queens: African American Women and Rock and Roll), and Marcus J. Moore (The Butterfly Effect: How Kendrick Lamar Ignited the Soul of Black America). Moderated by Bandcamp’s Jes Skolnik.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Non-Fiction

Kimberly Drew, arts writer, curator, and activist, This Is What I Know About Art, in conversation with celebrated photographer, artist, curator and author, Deborah Willis talking about art as both a reflection on society and an opportunity to change society and make inclusive space for artists. Moderated by Naomi Extra, scholar, poet and writer.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Comics / Fiction

What do you draw on — literally — to put an imaginary world with real stakes on the graphic novel page? Carey Pietsch discusses pulling readers into the D&D world of the #1 New York Times best-selling Adventure Zone series; Isabel Greenberg’s Glass Town reveals how the Brontë children co-created a fictional world out of bereavement; Bishakh Som builds fantastic architecture from real lives in Spellbound and Apsara Engine; and Julia Gfrörer’s protagonist pulls a new life from a haunted mirror in Vision. Moderated by writer/artist Camilla Zhang.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

World Builders of the Past and Future, Ilube Nommo Award–winning author Tochi Onyebuchi (Riot Baby) and #1 NYT bestselling author Christopher Paolini (To Sleep in a Sea of Stars) team up for a wide-ranging discussion about their newest books, world building in science fiction and fantasy, writing for a YA and an adult audience, and the fun of nerd culture in general. Tochi Onyebuchi is the author of Beasts Made of Night, its sequel Crown of Thunder, War Girls. Christopher Paolini is the author of the international bestsellers Eragon, Eldest, Brisingr, and Inheritance, as well as The Fork, the Witch, and the Worm. Moderated by Christina Orlando. Presented with the 370 🅙 Project, NYU.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Non-Fiction

Colson Whitehead and Arundhati Roy, two writers whose work has become powerfully embedded in our imagination over the past few decades, read from their recent work, followed by Q & A.  Whitehead, winner of the 2017 BoBi award, will read from his novel, The Nickel Boys, winner of the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Roy, who since her 1997 Booker Prize-winning novel, The God of Small Things, has emerged as one of India’s fiercest and most prescient political essayists, will read from her new collection, Azadi: Freedom. Fascism. Fiction. Introduced by Anderson Tepper.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Food / Non-Fiction

Eating today carries the weight of a myriad of environmental and social issues, and in doing so raises many questions about what it means to be a conscious and conscientious consumer, and the degree to which this is possible. This panel examines how we as eaters and cooks are complicit in these issues but also have the potential to help create change through our food choices. Examining farming, food deserts, consumerism and more, writers Tom Philpott (Perilous Bounty: The Looming Collapse of American Farming and How We Can Prevent It), Saru Jayaraman (Bite Back: People Taking on Corporate Food and Winning), Marion Nestle (Let’s Ask Marion: What You Need to Know About the Politics of Food, Nutrition, and Health), and Deborah Madison (An Onion in My Pocket) will take a thoughtful look at hopeful trends and changing tides. Moderated by Krishnendu Ray, associate professor of Food Studies at NYU.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

Jerry Saltz, a Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic, senior art critic of New York Magazine and author of How To Be An Artist and Darby English, art historian, Carl Darling Buck Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago and author of To Describe a Life: Notes from the Intersection of Art and Race Terror, engage in a talk about art and artists and interactions with art in time, space and place. Moderated by art historian, critic, and author Eva Díaz.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Poetry

Poets Mark Bibbins (13th Balloon), Eduardo C. Corral (Guillotine), Hafizah Geter (Un-American), and Jonah Mixon-Webster (Stereo (TYPE)) read from their new collections, and discuss how history and legacy serve as a lens in their work, through which to view the present moment. Moderated by Tina Chang, Brooklyn Poet Laureate.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Comics / Fiction

Leslie Stein‘s graphic memoir I Know You Rider takes place over the 12 month period surrounding an abortion, tackling the complex subject of reproductive choice —and choice more generally — candidly and philosophically. Adrian Tomine’s The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist is a comedic memoir about fandom, fame, and other embarrassments from the life of the New York Times bestselling author of Killing and Dying. Journalist and editor Nicole Rudick speaks to Stein and Tomine about their comics.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Love And Resistance Presented With The Center For Fiction. Join three powerhouse Latinx authors, Angie Cruz, Jaquira Díaz and Carolina De Robertis, in conversation on the themes of love and resistance in their work, and on the power of intersectional Latinx literatures to break silence, challenge oppression, and cultivate joy and justice.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Alexis Wright, two giants of contemporary literature, share creative visions that encompass millennia. For more than a half-century, Kenyan author Ngũgĩ  has been creating a highly-influential body of work ranging from novels, stories, plays, and memoir to radical essays on literary decolonization and language. His latest work, The Perfect Nine, marks something of a departure: a novel-in-verse that reimagines the origin story of the Gikuyu people of Kenya, blending folklore, mythology and allegory. Alexis Wright, a member of the Waanyi nation of the southern highlands of the Gulf of Carpentaria, is a towering figure herself, whose 2007 Miles Franklin prize-winning novel, Carpenteria, remains a landmark in Indigenous literature. The Swan Book, her most recent novel, is set in the distant future, with Aboriginal peoples living in an environment altered by climate change, drawing powerfully from myth, legend and fairy tale. Moderated by Caro Llewellyn.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

New York Times bestselling author Libba Bray (The King of Crows), acclaimed author Justin A. Reynolds (Early Departures), and debut novelist Ryan La Sala (Reverie) discuss dreams, death, destiny, and teens making big choices in worlds that blur the lines between reality and fantasy. Moderated by author Patrice Caldwell (A Phoenix First Must Burn).

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Childhood can seem to exist in a bubble, defined by the rituals of family and home. But outside pressures are never far off. In Romesh Gunesekera’s Suncatcher, a young boy in 1960s Sri Lanka revels in the thrill of the make-believe, while gradually becoming aware of the social and religious forces that threaten to divide the country. The protagonist of Ivan Vladislavic’s The Distance obsessively follows the career of boxing great Muhammad Ali in 1970s Pretoria, his hero-worship a form of defiance in apartheid-era South Africa. And in Suneeta Peres da Costa’s Saudade, the daughter of an Indian immigrant family in 1960s Angola learns to recognize the rumblings of a growing independence movement and end of colonial privilege. How are these different coming-of-ages marked by their own time and place, and what do they have in common? Moderated by Eric Banks, Director of the New York Institute for the Humanities.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

These authors’ books may focus on women at different stages and from different walks of life, but they are all united by their common desire to break out of the box patriarchy places them in. Join critically acclaimed novelist Lauren Francis-Sharma (Book of the Little Axe), highly anticipated debut novelist Emily Temple (The Lightness), and award-winning short story writer Laura van den Berg (I Hold a Wolf by the Ears) for a conversation about violence, economics, and colonialism, framed through the persistent shadow of misogyny. Moderated by Emily Firetog, deputy editor of Literary Hub.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Presented by TOPPLE Books. Melissa Faliveno’s Tomboyland navigates the mysterious terrain of androgyny and bisexuality, womanhood and rage, religion and myth, loneliness and love. Ultimately, she asks what it means to live in the spaces between and what it means to come home. In An American Covenant: A Story of Women, Mysticism, and the Making of Modern America, Lucile Scott shares the history of five female mystic leaders over three centuries for whom hope, liberation, and understanding are the foundation for living. Moderated by BRIC TV Chief Correspondent, Brian Vines, the conversation will land in contemporary American culture.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

As recent but all too familiar events force the country to grapple with its legacy of violence and racism, igniting a hopeful movement for substantive change across government and within industries, it is vital to engage not only perennial questions about representational politics in publishing, but also the material and demographic inequities in the industry that enable the exclusion of many voices and experiences. Our panel of professionals, from publishers to writers, weighs in on the current state of publishing, remedies to inequity in all its forms, and ways to move forward towards a vibrant and more just industry. Reagan Arthur, Publisher, Knopf; Nicole Chung, writer and Editor-in-Chief of Catapult Magazine; Erroll McDonald, Vice President, Executive Editor at Knopf and Pantheon; Luis Alberto Urrea, novelist, poet, and essayist will discuss what needs to be done to create effective change in a conversation moderated by Suzanne Nossel, Chief Executive Officer of PEN America.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

An Iranian journalist heads to the front lines of war in Iraq and Syria. A girl and her father are the last two people on Earth. And in a town ravaged by environmental disaster, a cult leader promises to bring rain. Where can these characters find humanity in such dystopian worlds? Join novelist Salar Abdoh (Out of Mesopotamia), critically acclaimed debut author Chelsea Bieker (Godshot), and National Book Award finalist Andrew Krivak (The Bear) as they discuss art, love, and other methods of surviving the apocalypse. Moderated by Jonny Diamond, editor-in-chief of Literary Hub.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Comics / Fiction

Writing down memories is an intimate act; drawing the remembered times is even more so, whether they’re yours or of those around you. Join these authors on the journey. Tyler Feder‘s Dancing at the Pity Party follows her journey dealing with her mother’s diagnosis and eventual death of cancer, while Mike Hawthorne’s Happiness Will Follow recalls growing up with a single mother and a Brujeria curse, and Yao Xiao’s Everything Is Beautiful And I’m Not Afraid, collecting her semiautobiographical comic Baopu, brings home a queer emigrant’s search for identity and connection. Moderated by Women Write About Comics editor-in-chief Nola Pfau.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

How will life in the pandemic define society or change it? Mark Honigsbaum (The Pandemic Century: 100 Years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris), Paolo Giordano (How Contagion Works: Science, Awareness and Community in Times of Global Crisis), and Sonia Shah (Pandemic: Tracking Contagions from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond) discuss personal and political responses to the pandemic we are living through and contemplate the future. Is there a new normal? Moderated by Brian Tate, president of Tate Strategy.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Corporate greed and extreme inequality loom large in these authors’ most recent books, which investigate the human implications of national politics through the lens of a marginalized immigrant family in one case and inter-class relationships in the other. Join Pulitzer Prize-winning author and playwright Ayad Akhtar (Homeland Elegies) and National Book Award finalist Emily St. John Mandel (The Glass Hotel) for a discussion about their latest novels. Moderated by Laura Marsh, literary editor of the New Republic.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

From humor to horror, from journalism to first-person POV, these authors explore connections between uprisings of the past and speaking out loud in the present day. Travel from the protests against war and incarceration in the 1970s with Jared Reinmuth (Big Black: Stand at Attica) and Derf Backderf (Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio) to present-day combat with everyday systemic aggressions visited on race and disability with A. Andrews (A Quick & Easy Guide to Sex and Disability) and Bianca Xunise (Be Gay Do Comics, Six Chix). Moderated by Matt Lubchansky, editor of The Nib. 

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Children required to be mature beyond their years, adults seeking lives worth writing about, and other fascinating characters populate the exciting novels and stories of these award-winning authors. Join Pulitzer Prize finalist Lydia Millet (A Children’s Bible), Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and novelist Héctor Tobar (The Last Great Road Bum), and best-selling author Lidia Yuknavitch (Verge) to learn about the challenges and possibilities of life on the margins. Moderated by Ryan Chapman, author of Riots I Have Known.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1-2pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Join four authors honored by the 2019 National Book Awards for a conversation on contemporary literature, recognition, and cross-genre Black storytelling. Featuring Kwame Alexander (The Undefeated, Longlist, Young People’s Literature), Jericho Brown (The Tradition, Finalist, Poetry), Marlon James (Black Leopard, Red Wolf, Finalist, Fiction), and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, Longlist, Nonfiction). Moderated by Lisa Lucas, Executive Director of the National Book Foundation.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

For most of our history the story has gone that white Southerners were racists while white Northerners were not. Today that myth is largely dismantled, thanks in part to two historians whose books lay bare the pernicious and widespread racism up north, and lift up the leaders and movements fighting these systems. Clarence Taylor (Fight the Power: African Americans and the Long History of Police Brutality in NYC) and Jeanne Theoharis (A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History) join the Brooklyn Historical Society for a conversation about a New York history that is, thankfully, no longer hidden.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

What happens when the world comes to a standstill, touch is forbidden, and everything we’ve known must be reimagined? Who can we turn to? In what promises to be an entertaining and candid discussion, award-winning author Rochelle Alers (The Seaside Café), USA Today best-selling author Beverly Jenkins (Bring on the Blessings), and Wayne Jordan (Promise Me a Dream) reveal the secrets of what keeps them going during these uncertain times and why their novels of love, redemption, and hope are more important to us now more than ever before. Moderated by Donna Hill, author of The Other Sister.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Join novelists Adania Shibli (Minor Detail), Alain Mabanckou (The Death of Comrade President), and Juan Pablo Villalobos (I Don’t Expect Anyone to Believe Me) as they discuss how the repercussions of violence are experienced on a literary level, and felt across generations and through history, and how the personal and political intersect in their works in both tragic and absurd ways.  While the world faces unrest from a multitude of directions, in some countries it’s been part of their very foundation. These authors’ books meditate on dispossession, violence, and language in Palestine; familial ties and political murder in 1970s Congo; and the kidnapping of a Mexican student by unlikely gangsters before his flight abroad to Spain. Moderated by Minna Zallman Proctor, author of Landslide: True Stories.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Racism, classism, distrust, and surveillance are just a few of the challenges one faces when trying to make earnest connections in lonely and trying times. But these stories just might contain the clues for a better future. Join award-winning novelist Kelli Jo Ford (Crooked Hallelujah), 5 Under 35 honoree Tracy O’Neill (Quotients), and New York Times best-selling debut author Kiley Reid (Such a Fun Age) for a discussion about some of the thorniest issues plaguing society today and how they affect human relationships. Moderated by Meakin Armstrong, senior fiction editor at Guernica.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Non-Fiction

Who do we trust to tell a story and who are the true witnesses to a reality impossible to understand from just one angle? Featuring Fernanda Melchor, Marcial Gala, and Nona Fernandez, this panel delves into the work of three vibrant new writers from Latin America whose novels provide polyphonic examinations of collective reckoning. Fernanda Melchor’s Hurricane Season, shortlisted for the 2020 International Booker Prize, captures a whirlwind of voices in an exploration of femicide in a rural village in Veracruz, Mexico. Marcial Gala’s The Black Cathedral, meanwhile, relies on a motley crew of murderers, gossips, and ghosts to tell a story of faith and shattered illusions in Cienfuegos, Cuba; while Nona Fernandez’s Space Invaders approaches Pinochet’s Chile through the eyes of schoolchildren only dimly aware of the dictatorship’s shadowy reach. Moderated by author and translator Idra Novey.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

Laughing Through Tears. A woman about to marry someone she doesn’t love. Gay men who can’t stop lying. A struggling writer’s desperate quest for connection. Black women who defy societal expectations to explore their dreams and desires. These characters may sound troubled, but what their authors have in common is a dark sense of humor when writing about love, sexuality, and getting older. Join award-winning author Marie-Helene Bertino (Parakeet), critically-acclaimed novelist Sarah Gerard (True Love), debut author Peter Kispert (I Know You Know Who I Am), and National Book Award long-lister Deesha Philyaw (The Secret Lives of Church Ladies) discuss humor as a means to survival. Moderated by Kendall Storey, associate editor at Catapult.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Non-Fiction

 Is it still possible to improve your lot in life??  Was it ever? Essayist Eula Biss (Having and Being Had), cultural historian Imani Perry (Breathe: A Letter to My Sons), journalist Ada Calhoun (Why We Can’t Sleep: Women’s New Midlife Crisis), and economist Stephanie Kelton (The Deficit Myth) discuss who is and isn’t able to prosper, what class feels like today, and how the answers to these questions are built into the very structure of our economy.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

What are our stories? As we grow up and figure out our place in the world, we find them — or create them. The pieces that make them up encompass queerness, racism, family history, politics, sexism, activism, and sports in this discussion with Mike Curato (Flamer), Kiku Hughes (Displacement), and Gene Luen Yang (Dragon Hoops). Moderated by New York Times Book Review editor MJ Franklin.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

A handsome baseball star, a Los Angeles talent manager who was in all the wrong places at all the wrong times, and a certain “nasty woman” who won a certain popular vote, reimagined through historical fiction—these characters prove that fame, in any field, has its price. Join celebrated writer and filmmaker Nelson George (The Darkest Hearts), debut novelist Emily Nemens (The Cactus League), and New York Times best-selling author Curtis Sittenfeld (Rodham) for a discussion of pop culture and politics. Moderated by Nicholas Mancusi, author of A Philosophy of Ruin.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

How is history lived and felt—embodied—in different times and places? How does it persist as memory, an almost tactile presence just beneath the surface? In Argentine writer Andrés Neuman’s Fracture, the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster provokes a personal reckoning for a globe-trotting Japanese executive, a survivor of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Jamaican writer Curdella Forbes’s A Tall History of Sugar, charts her country’s evolution from independence to today through the life of a mysterious, clairvoyant child born with translucent skin, a human palimpsest who defies racial and social categories. Meanwhile, Mozambican author Mia Couto, winner of the 2014 Neustadt International Prize for Literature, explores the final, nineteenth-century clashes of empire between Portuguese colonial forces and local rulers in The Sword and the Spear, shedding light, in the process, on Mozambique’s present legacy of violence and woe. Moderated by Rivka Galchen.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

A boy who believes in fairytales, a young psychic who can speak to the dead, besties about to break up, and three girls who take down a sexist list ranking their classmates by their looks. Author and librarian Betsy Bird leads characters from stories by Zoraida Córdova (The Way to Rio Luna), Gilbert Ford (The Mysterious Messenger), Debbi Michiko Florence (Keep It Together, Keiko Carter), and Brigit Young (The Prettiest) through a revealing personality quiz that will bring them to life.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 21

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

What are the histories we don’t hear? A jazz legend shines brightly during a dark time in his career; a mother tells moving stories of China’s Cultural Revolution to her daughter; and, in a master comics journalist’s latest epic, the Dene Nation of Canada’s sprawling Northwest Territories grapples with the economic reward and devastating cultural costs of development. Joe Sacco (Paying the Land), Dave Chisholm (Chasin’ the Bird: Charlie Parker in California), and Emei Burell (We Served the People) discuss bringing unseen or undertold history to light.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

It gets better — but the path to joy is never straight. From seeing to being, three Black Queer authors: George M. Johnson (All Boy’s Aren’t Blue), Jamal Jordan (Queer Love in Color) and Darnell L. Moore (No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black & Free in America) share their journey to fully realizing their Queer Black Selves and living their versions of joy. Moderated by BRIC-TV Chief Correspondent Brian Vines.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

New York Times bestselling authors Karen McManus (One of Us Is Next) and Rory Power (Burn Our Bodies Down) join acclaimed author Camryn Garrett (Full Disclosure) in a riveting conversation about fear, deception, and the lengths characters will go to keep some truths hidden. Moderated by debut author of K-pop Confidential, Stephan Lee.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

From an imagined New York City that literally comes alive, to an alternate American history that posits a militaristic Empire City, to the reality of police brutality on the streets of Los Angeles, these authors capture the essence of contemporary American urban life, along with its diversity, complexity, and flaws. Join Dayton Literary Peace Prize finalist Matt Gallagher (Empire City), Hugo Award–winning author N.K. Jemisin (The City We Became), and Ilube Nommo Award–winning author Tochi Onyebuchi (Riot Baby) as they mine the soul of the city. Moderated by Stephanie Anderson, assistant director of selection at BookOps.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Children / Fiction

An eccentric family of witches, malicious spirits wreaking havoc all over town, a road trip full of monsters and mayhem—‘tis the season for spooky stories that will give you, well, goosebumps. Join authors R.L. Stine (Goosebumps), Claribel Ortega (Ghost Squad), and Sophie Escabasse (Witches of Brooklyn) as they chat about all things that go bump in the night. Moderated by Max Brallier (Last Kids on Earth).

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction

From Massachusetts to the Middle East to colonial Jamaica, these books take readers around the world as their characters search for a way to live life on their own terms. Join debut novelists Zaina Arafat (You Exist Too Much) and Maisy Card (These Ghosts Are Family) and award-winning author Lily King (Writers & Lovers) for a conversation about the challenges and identities our homelands force upon us. Moderated by Alex Gilvarry, author of Eastman Was Here.

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm

June 28, 2020
12:00 am

Fiction / Non-Fiction

Though what emerges are two very different reads, both authors share an investigative, almost true-crime approach to their overlapping subjects: where Nick Flynn (This Is the Night Our House Will Catch Fire) goes on a personal detective hunt into the mysterious events of his family’s traumatic past and his mother’s profound struggles during his childhood, Susannah Cahalan (The Great Pretender) puts forth her own journalistic detective story around mental health and one of the most shocking chapters in the history of modern psychiatry. Moderated by New York Times book critic, Jennifer Szalai.

 

2020-06-28 00:00:00
June 28

1:00pm